There is a temptation among both casual and die-hard daily fantasy players to read about a hot young injury call-up and automatically slot him into their lineups. After all, you know that player is going to have close to a near-minimum salary, and likely isn't being brought up to sit on the bench.

That might be true, but you still need to know how to identify the best injury call-up options both at the plate and on the mound. Here are some factors to consider when deciding when to play a recent minor-league addition:

Will He Play?

This might seem overly simplistic, but it's still important. Sometimes, a call-up is inserted directly into the lineup in place of the injured player, so as not to disrupt team construction and chemistry. Wednesday provided an example of this, as the Houston Astros placed recalled outfielder Derek Fisher into the batting order in place of Josh Reddick; Fisher rewarded Houston's risk by belting his first career home run.

Other times, a recalled player is shuffled to the bottom of the pecking order while the manager opts to move a bench player into the starting lineup instead. It's critical to know which situation the recalled player is entering into, since you don't get any points for players who don't hit. It might be worth taking a game or two to see how the manager deploys a call-up before determining whether he's primed to be a fantasy factor.

Is the Lineup Stacked?

How a player performs in daily fantasy has just as much to do with the lineup around him as how he actually performs at the dish. Using Fisher as an example, he's expected to hit near the bottom of the Houston order - but what an order he's in, as the Astros are one of the top run-scoring teams in the league. This increases Fisher's chances of driving in and scoring runs no matter where he hits in the lineup.

Conversely, you need to consider the ramifications of a recalled player hitting in a poor lineup. He might see more playing time, but if the guys around him aren't producing, you could find yourself settling for singles and walks rather than RBI base hits and runs scored. Like any player you insert into your daily fantasy lineups, the supporting cast matters a lot - so consider this every time you construct a roster.

Who is He Facing?

This is a critical component of pitcher selection, whether you're talking about grizzled veterans or fresh-faced fireballers making their major-league debuts. The opponent should always come into play - and this is especially true of first-time hurlers, since the range of potential outcomes is larger than any other pitching situation you'll face. Simply put, your choice here could make you rich - or leave you in last place.

Inspect the recalled pitcher's opponent thoroughly. Does the opposing team work a lot of walks? Is it a free-swinging unit? How has it traditionally performed against recalled starters? The more information you can gather, the more informed your decision will be. As a general rule, rookies tend to struggle in their first time around the majors - but if you can find one who doesn't, it could make you a large-field champion.

How did He Perform in the Minors?

This is another basic concept, but there's more to this strategy than inspecting the W-L record and home-run totals. Minor-league injury recalls are often being brought in to fill a void left by the injured player - and that deficiency isn't always an offensive one. Sometimes, a player is recalled due to his defense - and while that might help the team in question, it isn't going to make him an appealing fantasy option.

Look at the home park where the player performs. Is it a bandbox? Is it cavernous? Did he strike out a lot? Does he have a good eye? For pitchers, consider K/9 and BB/9 rates. And if you're feeling particularly adventurous, look up the pitcher's game log to see if he is consistent, or all over the map. You can't always rely on the minor-league stat lines, but there is almost always some useful information contained within.How to Treat Injury Call-ups in Daily Fantasy

There is a temptation among both casual and die-hard daily fantasy players to read about a hot young injury call-up and automatically slot him into their lineups. After all, you know that player is going to have close to a near-minimum salary, and likely isn't being brought up to sit on the bench.

That might be true, but you still need to know how to identify the best injury call-up options both at the plate and on the mound. Here are some factors to consider when deciding when to play a recent minor-league addition:

Will He Play?

This might seem overly simplistic, but it's still important. Sometimes, a call-up is inserted directly into the lineup in place of the injured player, so as not to disrupt team construction and chemistry. Wednesday provided an example of this, as the Houston Astros placed recalled outfielder Derek Fisher into the batting order in place of Josh Reddick; Fisher rewarded Houston's risk by belting his first career home run.

Other times, a recalled player is shuffled to the bottom of the pecking order while the manager opts to move a bench player into the starting lineup instead. It's critical to know which situation the recalled player is entering into, since you don't get any points for players who don't hit. It might be worth taking a game or two to see how the manager deploys a call-up before determining whether he's primed to be a fantasy factor.

Is the Lineup Stacked?

How a player performs in daily fantasy has just as much to do with the lineup around him as how he actually performs at the dish. Using Fisher as an example, he's expected to hit near the bottom of the Houston order - but what an order he's in, as the Astros are one of the top run-scoring teams in the league. This increases Fisher's chances of driving in and scoring runs no matter where he hits in the lineup.

Conversely, you need to consider the ramifications of a recalled player hitting in a poor lineup. He might see more playing time, but if the guys around him aren't producing, you could find yourself settling for singles and walks rather than RBI base hits and runs scored. Like any player you insert into your daily fantasy lineups, the supporting cast matters a lot - so consider this every time you construct a roster.

Who is He Facing?

This is a critical component of pitcher selection, whether you're talking about grizzled veterans or fresh-faced fireballers making their major-league debuts. The opponent should always come into play - and this is especially true of first-time hurlers, since the range of potential outcomes is larger than any other pitching situation you'll face. Simply put, your choice here could make you rich - or leave you in last place.

Inspect the recalled pitcher's opponent thoroughly. Does the opposing team work a lot of walks? Is it a free-swinging unit? How has it traditionally performed against recalled starters? The more information you can gather, the more informed your decision will be. As a general rule, rookies tend to struggle in their first time around the majors - but if you can find one who doesn't, it could make you a large-field champion.

How did He Perform in the Minors?

This is another basic concept, but there's more to this strategy than inspecting the W-L record and home-run totals. Minor-league injury recalls are often being brought in to fill a void left by the injured player - and that deficiency isn't always an offensive one. Sometimes, a player is recalled due to his defense - and while that might help the team in question, it isn't going to make him an appealing fantasy option.

Look at the home park where the player performs. Is it a bandbox? Is it cavernous? Did he strike out a lot? Does he have a good eye? For pitchers, consider K/9 and BB/9 rates. And if you're feeling particularly adventurous, look up the pitcher's game log to see if he is consistent, or all over the map. You can't always rely on the minor-league stat lines, but there is almost always some useful information contained within.

Line

NBA (2 GAMES)

Denver
NA
Golden State
NA
Minnesota
NA
L.A. Lakers
NA

NHL (10 GAMES)

Colorado
NA
Minnesota
NA
Boston
NA
Detroit
NA

MLB (10 GAMES)

Minnesota
9.5
Detroit
1.5
St. Louis
8
Pittsburgh
-1.5

NFL (15 GAMES) Week 3

Baltimore
19.5
Jacksonville
2.5
Denver
19.5
Buffalo
2.5